Monstera Adansonii Propagation

Monstera Adansonii in Edmonton, Canada

The Monstera Adansonii is a climbing plant which is native to Central America. It thrives as an indoor plant, as long as it has bright light and doesn’t get too cold. It is a flowering plant, although it is usually only known to flower in the wild. What makes the Monstera Adansonii so popular is that it is easy to grow, and can even be grown from cuttings. This is fun for plant lovers, and also a great gift idea for those looking for a meaningful and different gift idea.

This post is about a Monstera Adansonii grown from cuttings. The owner can be found on instagram @megans.jungle. She has shared her tips and growth progress photos of a montera adansonii propagation over two years!

She has shared some Monstera Adansonii care tips which she has learned from this process.

Tip 1 – Propagation

Tips for growing plants from babies/clippings would be, have patience! It gets discouraging when you don’t see any growth right away but I don’t think I saw any real growth for close to a year with this plant and within this past year it has grown so so much so you just have to give your plant time to do it’s thing! 

Tip 2 – Soil

A second tip would be make sure you have well draining soil, if your plant starts to rot from too much moisture it’s hard to save it! 

It’s a typical mistake to want to over water your plants, but really they thrive when you give them the chance to dry out in between waterings. A soil I recommend is here.

Tip 3 – Sunlight

And lastly make sure you understand the amount of light your plant needs!! It’s crucial to use up the space in your home or wherever for the right plant! Sturdier plants who can handle more sunlight/ direct sunlight should be in south facing (north if you are in southern hemisphere) windows and if they need less direct sunlight east facing rooms/ windows are perfect! 

September 2018

September 2018: The cuttings were grown in water placed in a sunny location

December 2018

After a few months, the cuttings were planted into soil. This can sometimes be a challenging thing to get right, after the cuttings have been growing in water. Don’t worry! Sometimes it can take time, but they do eventually adjust to soil.

December 2018: Monstera adansonii propagation moved to soil

January 2020

The plant grew a small amount during 2019, but unfortunately we don’t have any photos during that year. As you can see, by January, the plant had started to push out trailing leaves, and was incredibly healthy.

January 2020: Successful monstera adansonii propagation after one year

December 2020

After another year of growth, the vines are now over 6ft long!

December 2020: Monstera Adansonii after two years, now 6ft long

This is incredibly satisfying to see the monstera adansonii growth rate. As you can see, once it is established and happy with its growing conditions, it is really quite fast growing. If you liked this plant, you may also be interested in the variety which has partially white leaves (variegation), here is a link to my post about a variegated monstera adansonii, showing that even the variegated version grows incredibly fast as well!

If you want to buy your own monstera adansonii, they are available for sale here:

USA – link to buy monstera adansonii $7.99

UK & EU – link to buy monstera adansonii £14.99

If you are interested in the variegated version, here is a link to the buying rare plants page which is updated regularly with current plants for sale in different regions.

If you enjoyed this post, you will also enjoy these:

Burro’s Tail Succulent Propagation

Variegated Monstera Growth Progress

Neon Pothos climbing wall growth progress

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